• Global Climate Exchange 09

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Part 1: April 27 - May 1 Students add descriptions of local issues to a collaborative Google Map. (90 minutes of work for each student.)

  • focus on issues in your county or region. Each student can add one issue- possible categories of issues: (1) sources of greenhouse gas, (2) weather patterns, (3) habitat destruction, (4) invasive species

Part 2: May 4 - May 8 Students explore and edit the "Issue pages" from other countries in Drupal. - (90 minutes of work for each student)

  • they will choose an issue from another country in the Google map that is interesting to them, and follow a link from that issue into a Drupal page, where they will add notes about the scientific explanation of that issue, as well as any similarities or relationships to issues in their own country.

Part 3: May 11 - May 15 Students read the notes made by their international peers about their own country's issues, and hold a "local discussion" with peers from their own country. (90 minutes of work for each student)

  • The goal here is for students to reflect about the climate change issues in their own country before discussing global issues with peers from other countries. They will read the pages about their own issues created by students from other countries, and hold an online discussion about the science of global climate change in their own country.

Part 4: May 18 - May 22 Students engage in an international discussion with peers: topics related to the science of global climate change.
(duration: run these discussions for 1 week, with 90 minutes of effort per student)

  • With more than 100 students, it will be good to have at least 4 or 5 discussion topics. Perhaps these could be related to major science themes: (1) sources of greenhouse gas, (2) weather patterns, (3) habitat destruction, (4) invasive species and (5) global interdependence.

This is a four part process, with students interacting with international peers only in the last part. They also collaboratively edit the "Issue Pages" in Drupal with peers from their own continent as well as one other (e.g., the Scandinavian and North American kids will collaboratively work on the Issue Pages from China).

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